Learning the 4-H way


New officers meet for training at start of new 4-H calendar year

By Beth Sergent - [email protected]



Pictured are those who have taken on the roll of either historian or reporter in their respective 4-H clubs this year. Pictured from left, Wyatt Harris, Shelby Waugh, Abby Bonecutter, Leah Lemon, Grace Sprouse, Morgan Roush, Cade Blackshire, Elizabeth Cunningham, Nathan Wood.


POINT PLEASANT — For many, the year starts on Jan. 1, but for those in 4-H clubs, another year starts on Oct. 1.

Oct. 1 is the beginning of the new “4-H calendar year” and on Monday night, the annual officers training was held at Bellemead UM Church. Officers training prepares those who are helping to lead their 4-H clubs to do so and do it well.

With well over 20 4-H clubs in Mason County, those clubs are full of young people who have stepped into the roles of president, secretary, song leader, game leader, historian, reporter and more.

Although many have an understanding what 4-H is, there are many layers to the organization. Facts include:

  • 4‑H is delivered by Cooperative Extension—a community of more than 100 public universities across the nation that provides experiences where young people learn by doing. Kids complete hands-on projects in areas like health, science, agriculture and citizenship, in a positive environment where they receive guidance from adult mentors and are encouraged to take on proactive leadership roles. Kids experience 4‑H in every county and parish in the country—through in-school and after-school programs, school and community clubs and 4‑H camps.
  • Since 4‑H began more than 100 years ago, it has become the nation’s largest youth development organization. The 4‑H idea is simple: help young people and their families gain the skills needed to be proactive forces in their communities and develop ideas for a more innovative economy.
  • 4‑H is led by a unique private-public partnership of universities, federal and local government agencies, foundations and professional associations. These partners work together to provide rich educational content and curriculum, resources in cutting-edge technology, insight into the latest national issues and innovative thought-leadership.

For more information on how to join a local 4-H club, call the WVU Extension Agency at 304-675-0888.

Information for a portion of this article provided by www.4-h.org.

Pictured are those who have taken on the roll of either historian or reporter in their respective 4-H clubs this year. Pictured from left, Wyatt Harris, Shelby Waugh, Abby Bonecutter, Leah Lemon, Grace Sprouse, Morgan Roush, Cade Blackshire, Elizabeth Cunningham, Nathan Wood.
http://mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_10.25-PPR-OFficers.jpgPictured are those who have taken on the roll of either historian or reporter in their respective 4-H clubs this year. Pictured from left, Wyatt Harris, Shelby Waugh, Abby Bonecutter, Leah Lemon, Grace Sprouse, Morgan Roush, Cade Blackshire, Elizabeth Cunningham, Nathan Wood.
New officers meet for training at start of new 4-H calendar year

By Beth Sergent

[email protected]

Reach Beth Sergent at [email protected] or on Twitter @BSergentWrites.

Reach Beth Sergent at [email protected] or on Twitter @BSergentWrites.

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