Mason Co. Haunts


Reincarnating The Lowe Hotel

Beth Sergent - bsergent@civitasmedia.com



Artist Jamie Sloane, sitting, and Designer Jim Hobbs, have begun creating boutique rooms at the Lowe Hotel, including room 309.


This is the first of the Lowe Hotel’s boutique rooms to be completed which reflect Artist Jamie Sloane’s original work fused with Designer Jim Hobb’s vision. This room reflects a late 1950’s and early 1960’s space with modern amenities.


POINT PLEASANT — The Lowe Hotel has seen its share of life over the years and though many have debated whether or not it’s haunted, it has certainly reincarnated itself into what the times ask of it.

Right now, the historic hotel, which was built roughly around the turn of the 20th Century, is embarking on a new project, creating artist inspired boutique rooms. These rooms are decorated by Designer Jim Hobbs around special pieces of vintage furniture and original works of art by Jamie Sloane. Both men are from Gallipolis, Ohio who struck up a friendship with Ruth Finley, the hotel’s owner. On a fateful day last year, Finely let Hobbs look through the attic at the hotel to reveal a treasure trove of furniture and special period pieces which began the venture.

Finley said the idea behind the boutique rooms, which will reflect eras the hotel has lived through, is that they “take in all that it (the hotel) has been.” There are plans for rooms reflecting the 1930’s, 1940’s, a riverboat theme and even, Mothman.

The first boutique room reflects items from the late 1950’s to early 1960’s, with Hobbs saying one of the ultimate goals was to design a space people wanted to stay in, including plush, modern bedding and amenities. Hobbs and Sloane, who are partners, said this was the perfect project to fuse their separate skills. Sloane’s four original pieces all operate around the theme of being unique amid family and friends, and the world in general which fits perfect with a “Rebel Without a Cause” era.

Of course, the Lowe Hotel has always been unique in Point Pleasant and the world in general. Guest accounts of some ghostly encounters are just small stories in a much larger one. Originally known as the Spencer Hotel, it was built for $65,000 with at least $10,000 of new furnishings, at the time, according to a publication Finley has detailing businesses in Mason County printed in 1905. At the time the article was printed, the first floor included the hotel lobby, barber shop, bar room, wholesale liquor room, dry goods store, banking rooms of the Merchants National Bank, a ladies reception area and billiard room. The Spencer family lost the hotel during the stock market crash of 1929 and the ensuing Great Depression. The Lowe family then purchased the hotel and had it until 1990 when Ruth and husband Rush bought this living, functional piece of history.

With that much life passing in and out of a building, there’s bound to be not only history but a little mystery to a place. The following are some of the most famous ghost stories from the hotel’s past:

The mezzanine on the second floor is said to house one of the most famous of the Lowe’s ghosts, a beautiful young woman seen dancing to music only she can hear. She is described as being barefoot, wearing a nightgown and having long, flowing hair. It’s rumored she’s the ghost of Juliette Smith, the middle child of Homer Smith, the original Lowe Hotel manager. As a young woman, Juliette loved music and dancing and fell in love with a local boy her father did not approve of, so the boy married another. Juliette never married.

Also on the second floor, reports of a young child riding a tricycle down the hallway and for some guests, they’ve heard the sound of laughter or the squeak of tricycle wheels. Often guests see orbs developed in their photos taken on this floor in the hallway.

The third floor is an active spot for ghost stories with guests and employees sometimes reporting hearing whistling when no one is around or report a sudden chill or sense they’re not alone. The transoms over doors are often found in the opposite position than when they were left or cleaning supplies are found lying around where no employee cleaned that day. Some have theorized this could be the spirits of many people who spent part of their lives working in the hotel.

Then there are the stories of seeing a river boat captain, possibly speculated to be Cpt. Jim O’Brien who manned the Homer Smith steamboat in 1915. His picture hangs in the river suite that overlooks the Ohio River.

On the other side of the third floor, many report seeing a man with a beard and wearing 1930’s clothing. Often somewhere around rooms 314 and 316, guests feel a person walks nonstop.

Then there is room 309 where guests have said to see a woman kneeling at the edge of the bed. Some have claimed to see a lump in the bed or a small child covered in bed linens. Occassionally the wind can blow in that room because the curtains change directions.

Again, all of these stories would be nothing without the history to help deepen the mystery. History, the Lowe Hotel has plenty of, though it continues to move into its future while embracing its past.

Hauntings and ghosts are in the eye of beholder. What some people see, others do not, whether it’s ghosts or a cloud in the shape of a unicorn. For instance, Hobbs and Sloane are now moving on to renovating room 309 into a boutique room – a room rumored to have experienced its own paranormal activity though to the two men, they’ve never had any experiences other than creating that comfortable space. If there is a woman kneeling at the foot of the bed in room 309, it’s a king-sized bed with new bedding in a room of new curtains, blinds and decorated with framed pieces of steamboats which have all docked at Point Pleasant.

These new boutique rooms which fuse vintage pieces and original art with modern comfort, seem to share space very well with any sort of Lowe ghosts who appear to be quite harmless. Ruth is planning on taking these boutique rooms, and the hotel, into hosting artist retreats starting in February or March. This is a new use of familiar space, bringing new people into town who spend money and curiosity learning about Point Pleasant.

Whether looking for a “haunted” room, or a “not haunted” room, a banquet room or a dancer floor, the Lowe Hotel can accommodate any guest’s needs, which is a part of its past which will always determine its future.

Artist Jamie Sloane, sitting, and Designer Jim Hobbs, have begun creating boutique rooms at the Lowe Hotel, including room 309.
http://mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_10.29-PPR-lowe-1.jpgArtist Jamie Sloane, sitting, and Designer Jim Hobbs, have begun creating boutique rooms at the Lowe Hotel, including room 309.

This is the first of the Lowe Hotel’s boutique rooms to be completed which reflect Artist Jamie Sloane’s original work fused with Designer Jim Hobb’s vision. This room reflects a late 1950’s and early 1960’s space with modern amenities.
http://mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_10.29-PPR-Lowe-pano.jpgThis is the first of the Lowe Hotel’s boutique rooms to be completed which reflect Artist Jamie Sloane’s original work fused with Designer Jim Hobb’s vision. This room reflects a late 1950’s and early 1960’s space with modern amenities.
Reincarnating The Lowe Hotel

Beth Sergent

bsergent@civitasmedia.com

Reach Beth Sergent at bsergent@civitasmedia.com or on Twitter @BSergentWrites.

Reach Beth Sergent at bsergent@civitasmedia.com or on Twitter @BSergentWrites.

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